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Node Roundup: Mailman, trayballoon, unembed

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Mailman

Mailman (GitHub: vdemedes/mailman, License: MIT, npm: mailman) by Vadim Demedes is a module for sending emails that supports generators. It uses nodemailer for sending email, and consolidate.js for templates, which means it supports lots of different template languages.

Generators are used for sending emails, so you can do this:

var mail = new UserMailer({ to: 'vadim@example.com' }).welcome();  
yield mail.deliver();  

Mailman expects a specific directory layout for views, but the added level of structure might help if you've got a big mess of email-related code in your current projects.

trayballoon

trayballoon

trayballoon (GitHub: sindresorhus/trayballoon, License: MIT, npm: trayballoon) by Sindre Sorhus is a module for showing system tray balloons in Windows. You can set the text and image to display, and a callback that will run when the balloon disappears:

trayballoon({  
  text: 'Unicorns and rainbows'
  icon: 'ponies.ico',
  timeout: 20000
}, function() {
  console.log('Trayballoon disappeared');
});

It also has a command-line tool which you could use to display notifications when things like tests fail. trayballoon works by bundling an executable called nircmdc.exe which is called with child_process.spawn.

unembed

Given some "embed code" for sites like YouTube and Vimeo, unembed (GitHub: colearnr/unembed, License: MIT, npm: unembed) by Prabhu Subramanian will extract the markup and produce a JSON representation. This might be useful if you're scraping sites that use embed codes, like blogs and forums.

I've never thought of applying the tiny modules philosophy to scraping, but it seems like a great way of sharing all of those hacks we use to extract data in a more structured way.

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Node Roundup: npm 2.0, nvm for Windows, xtpl

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npm 2.0

npm 2.0 has been released, and the announcement post has lots of details on the fixes it includes and the project's evolving release process. One major change is run-script now accepts arguments:

In npm@2.0.0, Ben changed npm run-script to allow you to pass arguments into scripts. That's a breaking change. It's as simple as that. Think of npm 2 as a step on the road towards getting npm right with semver. (There will be more. npm 3 will be out before the end of the year.)

The npm blog also has a post about multi-stage installs:

Multi-stage installs will touch and improve all of the actions npm takes relating to dependencies and mutating your node_modules directory. This affects install, uninstall, dedupe, shrinkwrap and, obviously, dependencies (including optionalDependencies, peerDependencies, bundledDependencies and devDependencies).

This post mentions that npm should be getting progress bars soon, and changes that bring it closer to supporting transactional installation.

nvm for Windows

Apparently, most Node version managers for Windows use batch files, so Corey Butler decided to try a different approach:

This version of nvm has no dependency on node. It's written in Go, which is a much more structured approach than hacking around a limited .bat file. It does not rely on having an existing node installation. Plus, should the need arise, Go offers potential for creating a Mac/Linux version on the same code base with a substantially easier migration path than converting a bunch of batch to shell logic.

You can get the source from GitHub at coreybutler / nvm, and he's got binary releases as well.

Corey also sent something called Fenix Web Server (GitHub: coreybutler / fenix, License: GPL), which is a static desktop web server powered by node-webkit:

You can quickly fire up/kill web servers through a GUI or the command line. It has push-button sharing capabilities (localtunnel). There's also a visual webhook receiver for viewing incoming requests, which also leverages localtunnel.

I like the idea of being able to easily create a static server and then share content with a tunnel.

xtpl

Yiming He sent in xtpl (GitHub: kissyteam / xtpl, License: MIT, npm: xtpl), an Express/Koa wrapper for eXtensible Template Engine. This template language is similar to others like ejs, but also allows you to add your own synchronous or asynchronous commands.

You can actually add commands to the template language, and they can be inline, block, and asynchronous. Here's an example:

XTemplate.addCommand('xInline', function(scope, option, buffer) {  
  buffer = buffer.async(function(newBuffer) {
    setTimeout(function() {
      newBuffer.write(option.params[0] + 1).end();
    },10);
  });

  return buffer;
});

The API documentation has more examples, and xtpl's readme has some Koa samples as well.

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Signature Pad, Windows 8.1 Apps with Open Source JavaScript

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Signature Pad

Signature Pad (GitHub: szimek / signaturepad, License: _MIT) by Szymon Nowak is a client-side library for drawing smooth signatures. It works with touchscreens and desktop browsers, and was inspired by the Smoother Signatures post on Square's (excellent) engineering blog.

The problem is that the signer's finger did not move in straight lines from point to point when tracing out this shape. Rather, our touch points are sampled from a full curve that the signer's finger traced on the touchscreen. While we can't know the original shape between the sampled points Android gave us, straight lines are not the best guess.

Szymon's implementation doesn't depend on any external libraries, and can draw signatures from DATA URIs.

var canvas = document.querySelector('canvas');  
var signaturePad = new SignaturePad(canvas);  
signaturePad.clear();     // Clears the canvas  
signaturePad.toDataURL(); // Returns signature image as data URL  
signaturePad.fromDataURL('data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0K...') // Draws signature image from data URL  

Building a Windows 8.1 App using Typescript and Open Source Libraries

Ingredimeals!

This screencast by Ala Shiban demonstrates how to use some of Microsoft's technologies with open source projects like AngularJS to create a Windows Store application.

I put together a 17 minute video that gets you started with writing a native Win8.1 app using HTML, CSS, JavaScript, TypeScript, AngularJS, Bootstrap, underscore, BankersBox and jQuery. The goal of the tutorial is to go through the end-to-end experience of developing a win8.1 app as quickly as possible while not developing a random 'hello world' app.

It's a fast screencast that packs a lot in, so if you can't keep up check out the source at AlaShiban / Ingredimeals. It uses TypeScript, Blend for Visual Studio, NuGet, jQuery, AngularJS, Underscore, and Bootstrap. Custom fonts are used to give the application a Windows 8 feel.

I haven't used Windows 8 or Visual Studio much before, so I thought it was interesting seeing how it integrated with third-party open source JavaScript libraries through NuGet, and how debugging JavaScript worked.

Something I hadn't seen before was MSApp.execUnsafeLocalFunction. I noticed Ala had to wrap some calls inside AngularJS (mainly things that wrote to innerHTML) to satisfy Microsoft's security requirements for Windows Store apps.

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Node Roundup: 0.10.7, JSON Editor, puid, node-mac

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You can send in your Node projects for review through our contact form.

Node 0.10.7

Node 0.10.7 was released last week. This version includes fixes for the buffer and crypto modules, and timers. The buffer/crypto fix relates to encoding issues that could crash Node: #5482.

JSON Editor Online

JSON Editor Online

JSON Editor Online (GitHub: josdejong / jsoneditor, License: Apache 2.0, npm: jsoneditor, bower: jsoneditor) by Jos de Jong is a web-based JSON editor. It uses Node for building the project, but it's actually 100% web-based. It uses the Ace editor, and includes features for searching and sorting JSON.

It's installable with Bower, so you could technically use it as a component and embed it into another project.

english-time

Azer Ko├žulu sent in a bunch of new modules again, and one I picked out this time was english-time (GitHub: azer / english-time, License: BSD, npm: english-time). He's using it with some of the CLI tools he's written, so rather than specifying a date in an ISO format users can express durations in English.

The module currently supports milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, and shortened expressions based on combinations of these. For example, 3 weeks, 5d 6h would work.

puid

puid (GitHub: pid / puid, License: MIT, npm: puid) by Sascha Droste can generate unique IDs suitable for use in a distributed system. The IDs are based on time, machine, and process, and can be 24, 14, or 12 characters long.

Each ID is comprised of an encoded timestamp, machine ID, process ID, and a counter. The counter is based on nanoseconds, and the machine ID is based on the network interface ID or the machine's hostname.

node-mac

node-windows provides integration for Windows-specific services, like creating daemons and writing to eventlog. The creator of node-windows, Corey Butler, has also released node-mac (GitHub: coreybutler / node-mac, License: MIT, npm: node-mac). This supports Mac-friendly daemonisation and logging.

Services can be created using an event-based API:

var Service = require('node-mac').Service;

// Create a new service object
var svc = new Service({  
  name: 'Hello World',
  description: 'The nodejs.org example web server.',
  script: '/path/to/helloworld.js')
});

// Listen for the "install" event, which indicates the
// process is available as a service.
svc.on('install', function() {  
  svc.start();
});

svc.install();  

It also supports service removal, and event logging.

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dependencies node modules authentication windows oauth

Node Roundup: 0.11.0, Dependo, Mashape OAuth, node-windows

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You can send in your Node projects for review through our contact form.

0.11.0, 0.10.2

Node 0.11.0 has been released, which is the latest unstable branch of Node. Node 0.10.12 was also released, which includes some fixes for the stream module, an update for the internal uv library, and various other fixes for cryptographic modules and child_process.

Dependo

Dependo

Dependo (GitHub: auchenberg / dependo, License: MIT, npm: dependo) by Kenneth Auchenberg is a visualisation tool for generating force directed graphs of JavaScript dependencies. It can interpret CommonJS or AMD dependencies, and uses MaDGe to generate the raw dependency graph. D3.js is used for drawing the results.

Mashape OAuth

Mashape OAuth (GitHub: Mashape / mashape-oauth, License: MIT, npm: mashape-oauth) by Nijiko Yonskai is a set of modules for OAuth and OAuth2. It has been designed to work with lots of variations of OAuth implementations, and includes some lengthy Mocha unit tests.

The authors have also written a document called The OAuth Bible that explains the main concepts behind each supported OAuth variation, which is useful because the OAuth terminology isn't exactly easy to get to grips with.

node-windows

node-windows (GitHub: coreybutler / node-windows, License: MIT/BSD, npm: node-windows) by Corey Butler is a module designed to help write long-running Windows services with Node. It supports event logging and process management without requiring Visual Studio or the .NET Framework.

Using native node modules on Windows can suck. Most native modules are not distributed in a binary format. Instead, these modules rely on npm to build the project, utilizing node-gyp. This means developers need to have Visual Studio (and potentially other software) installed on the system, just to install a native module. This is portable, but painful... mostly because Visual Studio itself is over 2GB.

node-windows does not use native modules. There are some binary/exe utilities, but everything needed to run more complex tasks is packaged and distributed in a readily usable format. So, no need for Visual Studio... at least not for this module.