The JavaScript blog.


apps browser routing chat

GitterCLI, Wayfarer

Posted on .


I'm pleased to see that applications made with Blessed are starting to trickle into the DailyJS inbox! GitterCLI (GitHub: RodrigoEspinosa/gitter-cli, License: MIT, npm: gitter-cli) by Rodrigo Espinosa Curbelo is a Gitter client for the terminal. Those of us that are seasoned IRC veterans aren't too fond of web chat clients, and although Gitter has IRC access, GitterCLI could potentially take advantage of Gitter-specific features.

It uses the node-gitter module, and works using the standard HTTP authentication API implemented by Gitter. One thing I noticed was it drops authentication tokens into a "secrets" JSON file, and I couldn't work out if it checks to see if the permissions are safe (i.e., not readable system-wide). So you might want to check the secrets file when running it on a shared server. It stores the authentication token rather than your password, but naturally it still needs some level of protection.

Update: Corrected the GitHub URL.


Wayfarer (GitHub: yoshuawuyts/wayfarer, License: MIT, npm: wayfarer) by Yoshua Wuyts is a client-side router, a bit like react-router. Wayrarer is slightly different because it's a "method-less" router with an EventEmitter-inspired API and supports composition through mounting subrouters.

This is what the super-pretty ES6 syntax looks like:

const wayfarer = require('wayfarer')

const router = wayfarer('/404')

router.on('/', () => console.log('/'))  
router.on('/404', uri => console.log('404 %s not found', uri))  
router.on('/:user', (uri, param) => console.log('user is %s', param.user))

// => 'user is tobi' 

// => '404 /uh/oh not found' 

The combination of Wayfarer's API and fat arrow is very easy to follow, and the API should be easy to use with your other favourite client-side libraries.


libraries node modules WebSocket command-line gulp build-tools chat

Node Roundup: nchat, hulken, cult

Posted on .


nchat (GitHub: irrationalistic/nchat, npm: nchat) by Chris Rolfs is a terminal-based chat application that uses WebSocket, which means it's easier to use on networks where IRC might be blocked.

Notifications are supported on Mac OS X, and the client can run as the server so you only need to install nchat itself. It supports a few IRC-style commands, like /users, and you can deploy it to hosting providers like Heroku.


Hulken (GitHub: hulken, License: MIT, npm: hulken) by Johan Hellgren is a stress testing tool for HTTP services. It can make GET and POST requests, and can be configured to send dynamic payloads.

You can use hulken as a command-line tool, or a Node module. The documentation includes all of the supported options, and you'll need to write an options.json file to use it on the command-line.


Cult (GitHub: typicode/cult, License: MIT, npm: cult) is a tool that monitors changes to a gulpfile and then reloads Gulp. You can run it on the command-line, and it uses the chalk library for pretty output. The readme has an example for supporting gulpfiles that are split across multiple files.