Parrot, Flush Timeouts

Alex R. Young





libraries modules timers api

Parrot, Flush Timeouts

Posted by Alex R. Young on .

libraries modules timers api

Parrot, Flush Timeouts

Posted by Alex R. Young on .


Parrot (GitHub: sailorjs/parrotjs, License: MIT, Bower: parrotjs) by Kiko Beats is a library for wrapping API calls to your server. You can register different environments, which makes it easy to switch between development and production. You can also register URLs with different protocols, so it's possible to make WebSocket or Ajax requests.

It has a fluent API, so you can chain calls. If you wanted to register your production and development servers, then you'd call endpoint.add:

  .add(name: 'development', url: 'http://localhost:3000')
  .add(name: 'production', url: 'http://example.com')

Specific API URLs can be added as well:

  .add(name: 'signup', path: 'user', method: 'post')
  .add(name: 'login', path: 'user/login', method: 'post');

Making an Ajax request to the signup route would just be parrot.ajax('signup', function(err, res) {.

This seems preferable to some client-side HTTP APIs. The author intended it to be used with Sails.js, but you could use it with other frameworks as well.


I've noticed a few libraries recently that aim to improve the JavaScript timer API. Alex Lawrence sent in flush-timeout (GitHub: efacilitation/flush-timeouts, License: MIT, Bower: flush-timeouts, npm: flush-timeouts), a module for overriding setTimeout.

Here's a quick example:


var i = 0;

function demo() {  
  console.log('i:', i);

setTimeout(demo, 500);  
setTimeout(demo, 1000);  
setTimeout(demo, 1500);



This will cause demo to immediately run three times, and then print Done. If you removed global.flushTimeouts then it would execute based on the delays passed to setTimeout.

flush-timeouts might be useful when you're trying to queue up tasks with setTimeout but have additional logic that determines if it's safe to run all the tasks at once. Or perhaps you've got tests for code that depends on setTimeout and don't want to wait. The author has supplied tests and build scripts so you can pick it apart to see how it works.