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Node Roundup: 0.11.8, tabby, Nixt

Alex R. Young

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Node Roundup: 0.11.8, tabby, Nixt

Posted by Alex R. Young on .
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testing node modules command-line substack node-web

Node Roundup: 0.11.8, tabby, Nixt

Posted by Alex R. Young on .

Node 0.11.8

The core developers are cranking the handle again and firing out releases. Today Node 0.11.8 was released, which upgrades uv and V8. There's a new buf.toArrayBuffer API, debugger improvements, and core module fixes.

I saw 0.11.8 announced on Twitter, and the author hinted at more frequent unstable releases.

tabby

If it's not TJ Holowaychuk it's Substack. I don't believe it's possible to write a weekly column about Node without mentioning one of them at least once. Substack just released a client-side project called tabby (GitHub: substack / tabby, License: MIT, npm: tabby), a module for creating web applications with tabs using progressive enhancement techniques.

Why is this notable? Well, Substack has been ranting about Node's module system and client-side code. He wants you to stop mucking about and require(). Tabby blends the browser and Node by using WebSockets, and makes judicious use of Node's core modules and streams.

For something focused on client-side code, it uses an interesting cocktail of modules. The inherits module provides browser-friendly inheritance, whilst still being compatible with util.inherits. And trumpet is used for parsing and transforming streaming HTML using CSS selectors. In the documentation, Substack recommends using hyperspace for rendering.

Looking through the examples, it definitely feels like idiomatic Node. I can imagine this style scaling up well to a larger web application.

Nixt

Nixt

Test code readability can bring huge gains when maintaining projects. Tests should communicate intent, and the longer they don't need heavy modification the happier everyone will be. I generally find myself writing DSL-like methods for tests that reduce code duplication, particularly in the set-up phase.

With that in mind, it's interesting to see Nixt (GitHub: vesln / nixt, License: MIT, npm: nixt) by Veselin Todorov. This is a module for testing command-line applications. It's based around expectations, which reminds me of good old Expect.

Nixt works well asynchronously because it supports middleware for ordering execution. It can be used with a test harness like Mocha, and allows you to define custom expectations, which is where your application-specific DSL-like test helpers come in.

Although I'm probably guilty of using Node for command-line scripts that could be done with a shell script (I write my share of shell script too though), Nixt seems like a great way to test them, particularly as people often forget to test such scripts.