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Colonne, n8iv, Three Bad Parts

Alex R. Young

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language oo backbone.js

Colonne, n8iv, Three Bad Parts

Posted by Alex R. Young on .
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language oo backbone.js

Colonne, n8iv, Three Bad Parts

Posted by Alex R. Young on .

Colonne

Colonne (GitHub: rtsinani / colonne, License: MIT) by "rtsinani" is a small Backbone.js library that extends Backbone.History to expose two new properties: path and params:

// URL fragment: /products/search?names=apple&names=nectarine&page=1

Backbone.history.path               // 'products/search'  
Backbone.history.params['names']    // ['apple', 'nectarine']  
Backbone.history.params['page']     // '1'  

It also works with Backbone.history.navigateWith.

The author has included Backbone's router tests to demonstrate that Backbone's original functionality still works, and has added new tests for Colonne.

n8iv

n8iv (License: MIT) by Christos Constandinou is an OO library that extends native objects with Object.defineProperty. The author has written lots of documentation that's viewable on GitHub at constantology / n8iv / docs. The documentation shows what objects have been extended and what the n8iv classes provide.

For example, there's an event library that works like this:

var observer = n8iv.Observer.create();  
observer.log = console.log;

observer.on('foo', log)  
        .on('foo', observer.log, observer)
        .broadcast('foo', 1, 2, 3);

The n8iv.Class library supports mixins, singletons, and super methods.

The author also notes that native methods are not overridden if they're already defined. In addition, the other n8iv libraries like n8iv.Oo.js can be used without the native extensions.

Three Bad Parts

In JavaScript - Only Three "Bad" Parts, John Paul discusses Douglas Crockford's JavaScript:The Good Parts and how there are only really three "bad" parts. His post is actually more about learning the language properly than problems inherent to JavaScript.

John argues that once this, prototypal inheritance, and functions are properly understood, then budding JavaScript developers can be more productive.

When was the last time that you had a really hard time using the void keyword or were foiled by type coercion?