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jQuery Roundup: Fullscreen Events, Plugin Skeleton, Wijmo

Alex R. Young

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jQuery Roundup: Fullscreen Events, Plugin Skeleton, Wijmo

Posted by Alex R. Young on .
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jquery ui graphics plugins

jQuery Roundup: Fullscreen Events, Plugin Skeleton, Wijmo

Posted by Alex R. Young on .

Welcome to the jQuery roundup. You can send your plugins and articles in
for review through our contact form or
@dailyjs.

jQuery Fullscreen

jquery.fullscreen.js by Rui Lopes provides event detection when people switch their browser
to fullscreen mode:

$(window).bind('fullscreen-on', function(e) {
  // Do things that depend on fullscreen
});

This might be useful for building interfaces that adapt to the extra
space in fullscreen mode.

The author says it's only been tested in Chrome and Firefox, and there's
no cross-browser way to trigger fullscreen, but it's a fairly new plugin
so it'll get updates for more major browsers soon.

jQuery-Plugin-Skeleton

jQuery-Plugin-Skeleton by Oscar Godson is a plugin skeleton. His skeleton includes a license in
the plugin's source, but there aren't any unit test stubs. I talked to
him through GitHub's messaging system and he seemed to think sample
tests might be useful.

My ideal skeleton would look like this:

  • README.txt - This should contain fields for things like author name, contact, web site, links to more documentation, license name, contribution submission guidelines
  • MIT_LICENSE
  • GPL_LICENSE
  • unit_test.js - Simple QUnit test stub
  • jquery.plugin.js - Similar to Oscar's example

I imagine readers of this blog wouldn't usually use a skeleton because
they probably know exactly how they want to package their plugins, but
it would be nice to get new plugin authors off to a good start.

Wijmo

Wijmo from ComponentOne LLC is an open source (dual MIT, GPL) and commercial kit of jQuery UI widgets. There are a lot of
widgets available, including a very modern-looking chart library and
cool calendar.

The commercial license is per-developer,
at \$499, and it's royalty free. Although I appreciate the massive
amount of open source jQuery plugins out there, I think it's interesting
that a developer has built a business model around their plugins (a bit
like Sencha).

Wijmo is on GitHub at github.com/wijmo.